Search

Email us 

fonderiausa@gmail.com

 

This area does not yet contain any content.

Blog Index
The journal that this archive was targeting has been deleted. Please update your configuration.
Navigation
Tuesday
Sep182012

The Largest Mass Lynching in U.S. History 

New Orleans, March 14, 1891. The acquittal of 18 Italian-Americans falsely accused of murder led to 11 of them being beaten, shot and hung in the largest mass lynching in American history. On October 14, 1890, just before midnight, police chief David Hennessy was gunned down by three men on the streets of New Orleans. He died 34 hours later. Although nobody saw who shot him, the day after the murder journalists wrote "It is supposed that it is the work of Italians", followed by a more direct “Killed by Dagos”. (more

Tuesday
Sep182012

Rosa Cresci attacked by a cop

New York. On August 2, 1886, Rosa 'Rosie' Cresci, a pretty 16 year old who lived on 39 Mott Street with her family, became a little hero. She fought back Flood, a drunken policeman who spent his time harassing women. “"I was going to the drug store. It was about three o'clock in the afternoon. In Park Street this officer stopped me, caught me by the wrist and said, 'Where are you going?' I told him. Then he said, "I want you to meet me tonight.' I said I couldn't do such a thing (more

Tuesday
Sep182012

13 killed in Tarrytown 

May 19, 1891.  A thousand pounds of blasting powder contained in 50-pound cases en route for Tarrytown on a flat car on the New York Railroad exploded. 13 men who were on the car were killed, and 22 others were severely injured. 10 of the 13 killed were Italian laborers, and nearly all of the wounded were Italian but their names were known only to McCarthy, the dead time keeper. (more

Tuesday
Sep182012

Peculiarities of poor Italians

New York Tribune, October 2, 1887 - "The Italians ought to have a hospital of their own," said Dr. Pinkerton at Bellevue Hospital recently, "Just hear that fellow scream; why, It's enough to frighten the tramps In the cells below. What's the matter with him? A crushed leg. It's painful, of course, but that is not what ails him.  (more)

Tuesday
Sep182012

The Five Points Settlement 

New York, 1855. "Coming up Chatham Street and bending your course to the left, you turn into Baxter Street, a dark, damp, muddy street, forming one of the Five Points. On each side of the way are stores of old clothes and heterogeneous articles, kept by Polish and German Jews. Numerous 'Unredeemed Goods for Sale,' in the shape of coats, vests, and other unmentionable garments, are suspended on wooden stands in front of the doorways. There are also junk-stores, rags, bones, and old metal depots, and two Italian groceries, one opposite the other. Advancing farther, you reach the centre of the Five Points, synonymous of whatever is degraded and degrading, (more

Page 1 ... 1 2 3 4