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PHOTOS BY SIMONA ARU


PHOTOS BY SEBASTIAN PIRAS


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Sunday
Jun162013

LOST CITIZENS

The stories narrated in this documentary are those of the people of Sulcis, one of the poorest provinces of Italy, a former mining region converted into industrial pole without a coherent development policy, and now looking for sustainable alternatives. The main characters tell us about their present struggles (more)

Sunday
Jun162013

SFOGLIATELLE

Sfogliatelle are shell shaped filled pastries created in the 17th century by the nuns of the Monastery of Santa Rosa in Conca dei Marini, a fishing village in the province of Salerno. The nuns were not allowed to leave the monastery so they were as independent as possible, baking their bread, growing fruit and vegetables (more)

Friday
Jun142013

ROSA MARIA SEGALE AKA SISTER BLANDINA

Born in Cicagna, a town in the Province of Genoa, on May 23, 1850Rosa Maria Segale emigrated to Cincinnati with her family when she was four years old. There, a community of Elizabeth Ann Seton’s Sisters of Charity was very active and, in 1866, when she was 16, Rosa and her sister Maria joined the congregation. Maria became Sister Justine and Rosa became Sister BlandinaAt 22Sister Blandina was assigned to work on the frontier as a missionary in the southern Colorado town of Trinidad, the Wild Wild West. With four nuns (more)

Thursday
Jun132013

CANNOLI

Cannoli are the most famous Sicilian pastry desserts. The name comes from the Latin "canna", or reed, because they are very thin tube-shaped shells of fried pastry dough filled with sweetened ricotta (made with sheep’s milk). Cannoli originated in Palermo, Sicily, and Cicero in 70 a.C., while he was working (more)

Wednesday
Jun122013

Wednesday
Jun122013

ITALY, BEACHES AND BIKINIS

By Caroline Chirichella - I spent the summer of 2011 in Italy studying opera. Most of my time was spent on the beautiful island of Ischia, just off the coast of Naples. While I was packing for my trip, I of course packed a lot of bathing suits. All of them were bikinis, except for one. I packed a black one piece with a matching skirt, in case, as I told my mother, I had a fat day. I had heard that Italians were different when it came to swimwear, but I had no idea just how different they (more)

Tuesday
Jun112013

ROCKY MARCIANO

Born on September 1, 1923, in the north side of Brockton, Massachusetts, Rocco Francis Marchegiano was an Italian-American boxer, the World Heavyweight Champion from September 1952 to April 1956, and the only boxer to hold the heavyweight title and go untied and undefeated throughout his career. His father, Pierino Marchegiano, was from Ripa Teatina, Abruzzo, while his mother, Pasqualina Picciuto, was from San Bartolomeo in Galdo, Campania. Rocky had three sisters: AliceConcetta and Elizabeth, and two brothers —Peter, whom they called Sonny, and Louis. He dropped out of (more)

Saturday
Jun082013

AMATRICIANA

Sugo all'amatriciana or alla matriciana is a traditional, simple pasta sauce based on guanciale (cured pork cheek), tomatoesolive oil and grated pecorino cheese. It was invented in Amatrice, a town in the mountainous province of RietiLazio region, as a spinoff of a recipe called griciaGrici were sellers of bread and food, called grici by the Romans because many (more)

Saturday
Jun082013

MEN AGAINST GRANITE - GIACOMO COLETTI

by Mary Tomasi, Vermont, 1938 - A cold February morning is breaking. A slanting sun has not yet pierced the winter-thin clouds. Only a chill grey sky, and a frosty haze hang over the sleeping 'Granite City.' But for Giacomo Coletti and some 1,300 Italian, Scotch, Scandinavian, Spanish and French granite workers, day has begun. For Giacomo the alarm goes off every morning at 6:30. It makes a harsh, grating sound, grating enough his wife Nina says, to call the morti from their graves. (more)

Friday
Jun072013

POKE ONE OF MY EYES OUT

"Cutting off the nose to spite the face" we say when we want to describe a needlessly self-destructive reaction, somebody who is acting out of pique, or who is pursuing revenge in a way that would damage him/her more than the object of his/her resentment. In Italy there are many ways to describe this particular action because it is, unfortunately, a common and dangerous problem, but one expression among all describes it perfectly: cecami un occhio, literally poke one (more)

Friday
Jun072013

DEAN MARTIN, KING OF COOL

Playboy called him “the coolest man who ever lived.” Elvis Presley worshipped him. “He was the coolest dude I’d ever seen, period,” recalled Stevie Van Zandt, adding, “He wasn’t just great at everything he did. To me, he was perfect.” That man is Dean Martin. Simply put, he was a great singer. The warm sensuality (more)

Thursday
Jun062013

I'D RATHER SHOVEL COAL THAN BE A CARUSO!

Meriden, 1919 - Caruso is the most famous and richest of tenors. His income from his voice runs into the hundreds of thousands of dollars each year. He is courted and feted wherever he goes, receiving often indeed, although beginning life as a butcher's boy, the honors of royalty. Hundreds of thousands of his countrymen look upon Caruso with eyes of admiring envy. Is there, in fact, one who doesn't? There certainly is! Tony Ponzillo brother of Rosa Ponselle, prima donna of the great Metropolitan (more)

Thursday
Jun062013

ANCESTRY - ITALIANS AND SICILIANS

by Angelo F. Coniglio - Many Americans of Italian descent make the same plaintive comment when asked about the origins of their immigrant ancestors: “My parents (or grandparents) never talked about it.”  I hope, through this column, to help you discover long-lost information about your Italian or Sicilian roots.  You may ask: “Sicilian, Italian – aren’t they the same?”  A short history is in order (more)

Wednesday
Jun052013

LA MORRA

Morra is a hand game that dates back thousands of years to ancient Roman times. It can be played with two, three, or more players. Players throw out a hand showing zero to five fingers, and call out loud their guess at what the sum of all fingers shown will be. If one player guesses the sum (more)

Tuesday
Jun042013

VINCENZO ATTOLINI

“A good tailor is nothing but a craftsman who makes imperfect clothes for imperfect bodies.” Attolini is the name of a family, a big family, inextricably united over three generations by a profound passion: elegant menswear. In the late 1920s, Neapolitan fashion design was well-known all around Italy, a mixture of British style with French and Spanish influences. Despite the climate and the uncomfortable stiffness of its shapes, Neapolitans dressed as British people. Until a 29 year old Neapolitan tailor, Vincenzo Attolini, who had a strong creative intuition, a deep sense of harmony, and an (more)

Sunday
Jun022013

SILVIA MANNARELLI

The second young photographer we are featuring is Silvia Mannarelli. Born in Rome in 1986, Silvia has visited 5 Continents, photographing everything that caught her eye. Her dream is to become a photo-journalist. See also: Silvia's RomeEarly Spring in Campo de Fiori, Spring, and Silvia's Europe.

Saturday
Jun012013

JUNE 2 - FESTA DELLA REPUBBLICA

Festa della Repubblica (Republic Day) is a public holiday that commemorates the end of monarchy, and the beginning of the Italian Republic. A referendum was held on June 2, 1946to ask Italian people to decide on the form of government, following World War II and the fall of Fascism. It was the first time Italian women were allowed to vote. With 12,717,923 votes for a republic and 10,719,284 for the monarchy, the male descendants of the House of Savoy were sent into exile. (more)

Saturday
Jun012013

NONNA USED TO SAY

A cicala canta, canta e po’ schiatta. The cicada sings, sings, and then dies. –  It comes from one of Aesop's fables: the cicada spends the summer singing while the ant stores away food. When the weather turns bitter, the cicada finds herself without food and dies. Ergo: superficial people don’t go far. (more)

Thursday
May302013

SANTA ROSALIA IN THE BRONX

Williamsbridge, New York, 1909 - They have vivid memories in Williamsbridge of Santa Rosalia of Palermo. In the colony on Jerome street are many Palermese [Palermitani, people from Palermo], and where there are Palermese there is Santa Rosalia. In far Palermo their own dear saint is more thought of than the Virgin. Her feast is the great feast—the 9th to the (more)

Tuesday
May282013

NUMBER 17

In Italian culture, the number 17 is considered unlucky: it is not uncommon to find buildings that do not have a 17th floor, hotels that do not have a room 17, and when it is Friday the 17th, superstitious Italians worry. Some say it is a myth created by the Ancient Romans17 is written XVII in Roman numerals, and if you change it into an anagram it becomes VIXI, which in Latin means "I have lived", implying (more)