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PHOTOS BY SIMONA ARU


PHOTOS BY SEBASTIAN PIRAS


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Sunday
Mar242013

JOE BARBERA

Tom & JerryYogi BearThe FlintstonesThe Huckleberry Hound ShowTop CatScooby-DooThe Quick Draw McGraw ShowThe SmurfsWacky RacesHair BearMagilla GorillaMotormouse and AutocatThe Jetsons and many more cartoons have one person in common: Joe Barbera. (more)

Saturday
Mar232013

PALM SUNDAY

In ancient times, palm branches symbolized goodness and victory: Palm Sunday falls on the Sunday before Easter, it is the beginning of Catholic Holy Week, and it celebrates Jesus' journey into Jerusalem to celebrate Passover. The earliest mention of Palm Sunday is found in the Sacramentary of the Bobbio Abbey (more)

Saturday
Mar232013

HOWARD MISSION ON THE BOWERY - 1872

The Howard Mission and Home for Little Wanderers is situated in the heart of the Fourth Ward, in one of the most wretched quarters of the city [New York]. Here the inhabitants are packed into their dirty dwellings at the rate of 290,000 persons to the square mile. The dirt and the wretchedness of this part of the city are terrible to behold, the sufferings of the people are very great, and the mortality is heavy. Sailors’ lodging houses of the lowest character, dance houses, rum shops (more)

Friday
Mar222013

PIETRO CESARE ALBERTI

As far as we know, the first Italian American to land in New York was Pietro Cesare Alberti, a Venetian immigrant. Son of Andrea Alberti and Veronica Cremona, Pietro was born on June 20, 1608, in the height of the Republic of Venice's (a state that existed from the late 7th century until 1797) commercial (more)

Thursday
Mar212013

ITALIAN STREET MUSICIANS - 1872

by James D. Mccabe, Jr - It would be interesting to know the number of street musicians to be found in New York.  Judging from outward appearances, it must be their most profitable field, for one cannot walk two blocks in any part of the city without hearing one or more musical instruments in full blast. A few are good and in perfect tone, but the majority emit only the most horrible discords. Prominent among the street musicians are the organ grinders, who in former days monopolized the business. They are mostly Italians, though one sees (more)

Wednesday
Mar202013

ROME’S SPRING FESTIVALS: CYBELE AND ATTIS

The great Spring Festival of Cybele and Attis is best known to us in the form in which it was celebrated at [ancient] Rome; but as we are informed that the Roman ceremonies were also Phrygian, we may assume that they differed hardly, if at all, from their Asiatic original. The order of the festival seems to have been as follows.  On the twenty-second day of March, a pine-tree was cut in the woods and brought into the sanctuary of Cybele, where it was treated as a (more)

Wednesday
Mar202013

SPRING EQUINOX

Snow melts, streams swell, plants bloom, the axis of the Earth raises its tilt toward the Sun, the length of daylight increases... it’s Spring! Welcome rebirth, renewal, and regrowth. To celebrate it, we selected a very important Italian poem by Giacomo Leopardi (translated by Jonathan Galassi), The Lonely Sparrow (more)

Tuesday
Mar192013

SAN GIUSEPPE – FATHER'S DAY IN ITALY

Festa del Papà: from New York, auguri a tutti i papà italianiSaint Joseph's DayMarch 19, is Father's Day in Italy. Children make special cards for their fathers while mothers prepare (or buy) tasty zeppole and bigné, light pastry puffs filled with cream. St Joseph's Annual Bonfires are lit everywhere and they are a pagan reminder of ancient festivities to celebrate the end of winter. Giving food to the needy is also a very (more)

Tuesday
Mar192013

ZEPPOLE FOR ST. JOSEPH’S DAY

Most people know of Zeppole but if you ask different Italians you will get different answers on the shape, the consistency, filling or not filling, and everybody is an expert. Zeppole di San Giuseppe are Southern Italian pastries traditionally served for the Feast of St. Joseph on March 19. They are deep-fried or baked round dough balls filled with pastry cream or sweetened ricotta, topped with powdered sugar. They are easy to make: you only need flour, sugar, eggs, butter and olive oil for the pastry; flour, eggs, sugar and milk for (more)

Monday
Mar182013

THE ITALIAN HALL DISASTER

It is impossible to understand what truly meant to be a miner in the early 1900s. The Italian Hall Disaster, a tragedy that occurred on December 24, 1913 in Calumet, is a perfect example of the struggle our ancestors had to endure. 73 peopleincluding 59 children, were crushed to death in a stampede when someone yelled "fire" at a party attended by 400 people, mostly Finnish striking mine workers and their families. Among the victims, three girls: Jenny Giacoletto (9), Teresa Rinaldi (12), and Caterina Bronzo (21) (more

Sunday
Mar172013

ST. PATRICK'S WELL

You may have said "It's like digging St. Patrick's Well" sometimes in your life, meaning you are not getting anywhere because the well is unbelievably deep. In Italy you hear people saying “I am not St. Patrick's Well” meaning that they do not have an inexhaustible means of funds. The Pozzo di San Patrizio (St. Patrick's Well) is a real well in Orvieto, Umbria, central Italy. (more)
Sunday
Mar172013

SAINT PATRICK'S OLD CATHEDRAL

The corner stone of Old St. Patrick's – New York City’s first Cathedral Church - was laid on June 8, 1809. It was dedicated on May 14, 1815, and on that day the New York Gazette described the cathedral as "a grand and beautiful church, which may justly be considered one of the greatest ornaments of our city." Designed by architect Joseph Francois Mangin, St. Patrick's has great dignity and character in its restrained simplicity. Her sidewalls rise to a height of 75 feet, and the inner vault is 85 feet high. The church is over 120 (more)
Saturday
Mar162013

ARTICHOKES

Fat free, cholesterol free, sweet and aromatic,artichokes are another fundamental part of Italian cousine. Food Historians believe that the plant originated in Southern Europe around theMediterranean Sea. Some say in Sicily, others in Tunisia(Carthage), nobody knows. We know that artichokes were cultivated in Sicily in the first century and, at that time, Greeks and Romans called it cynara. They thought artichokes had afrodisiac powers so they gave it the name of a girl Jupiter seduced and later transformed (more)

Wednesday
Mar132013

CORRADO PARDUCCI

Corrado Parducci: I was born in a small town near Pisa, about 10 miles east of Pisa. A mountain village there. Buti is the name. And I had a very strange beginning. We were a large family: thirteen children. I was about the middle, about the fifth or sixth child. But my father left the family in Italy and took me—I was four years old at the time—took me along. I might have been a problem child for all I know. He took me along (more)

Sunday
Mar102013

HISTORICAL PHOTOS, A NEW TAB

We have added a new tab, Historical Photos, to our History’s drop down menu to give our followers a visual voyage into the past. You will also find historical photos in Clippings, in the History drop down menu. Let us know if you have any suggestions by writing to fonderiausa@aol.com

Saturday
Mar092013

THE IRISH AND THE ITALIANS

New York Tribune April 19, 1908  - In addition to the task of interesting the Italians in the Church there was always the fear of a clash between them and the Irish. September 20, celebrated by the Italians as the consummation of their national glory and marking the occupation of Rome by Victor Emmanuel and the downfall of temporal power, was a day cordially hated by the Irish Catholics, and ever so small a cause would have served to provoke an attack by them upon the annual procession of the Italians. (more)

Saturday
Mar092013

ROY CAMPANELLA

Italian-African-American baseball player Roy Campanella was born on November 19, 1921 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He led National League catchers in putouts six times, and clubbing 242 home runs in his 10-year Major League career. Roy played for the Brooklyn Dodgers during the 1940s and 1950s. Roy's father, John Campanella, was the son of Sicilian immigrants and his mother Ida was African American. Roy was barred from Major League Baseball until 1947 (more)

Saturday
Mar092013

NATIONAL MEATBALL DAY

Unless  you are a vegetarian, you must love polpette (meatballs), polpettine (small meatballs) and polpettone (meatloaf). March 9 is National Meatball Day and it is not clear who started this food-holiday but it gained many followers right away. Our favorite recipe is beef and pork in equal proportions, stale bread soaked in (more)

Friday
Mar082013

MOTHER CABRINI

Los Angeles Herald, November 12, 1905 - The 25th anniversary of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus will be celebrated in Los Angeles. For the first time in the history of Los Angeles the silver Jubilee of the founder of a religious order will be celebrated here, with the founder and superior general of the order as a guest of the local convent. Rev. Mother Frances Xavier Cabrini started the order of the Missionary Sisters 25 years ago with two other young women near Milan, Italy. (more)

Thursday
Mar072013

BEANS – CANNELLINI AND BORLOTTI

Beans are harvested in summer; it takes about 60 days from planting to harvest (start planting them now if you want to eat them in June) and some of us who are over 40 may remember shelling fresh beans’ pods for hours when we were young. Ancient Romans ate cowpeas (fagiolo dall’occhio), large-seeded broad beans like fava, and lupins, but they did not consider it 'noble' food because it was easy to grow, (more)