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Wednesday
Apr102013

CIOCCOLATA CALDA

by Caroline Chirichella - Ahhhh, breakfast in Italy. That lovely time when you wake up, pop out of bed and you’re excited for another day of sight-seeing and delicious food. You get ready and go out for that much needed cappuccino (or Cioccolata Calda). I was in Rome and Florence over this past winter and it was cold, (more)  

Friday
Apr052013

CARBONARA

CarbonaraPasta Cacio e Uova, have one thing in common: a sauce of whisked fresh eggs and grated cheese. It may sound gross but it is delicious, and Carbonara is the queen of pastas in Rome. Most important, it is the (more

Tuesday
Mar192013

BIGNÈ DI SAN GIUSEPPE

You can find these extremely light pastry puffs filled with pastry cream and sprinkled with powdered sugar in every traditional pastry shop in Rome, but you will see it in all bars and all pastry shops a few weeks before March 19, the day of the Feast of St. Joseph. They are related to Zeppole, they are their fluffy (more)

Tuesday
Mar192013

ZEPPOLE FOR ST. JOSEPH’S DAY

Most people know of Zeppole but if you ask different Italians you will get different answers on the shape, the consistency, filling or not filling, and everybody is an expert. Zeppole di San Giuseppe are Southern Italian pastries traditionally served for the Feast of St. Joseph on March 19. They are deep-fried or baked round dough balls filled with pastry cream or sweetened ricotta, topped with powdered sugar. They are easy to make: you only need flour, sugar, eggs, butter and olive oil for the pastry; flour, eggs, sugar and milk for (more)

Saturday
Mar162013

ARTICHOKES

Fat free, cholesterol free, sweet and aromatic,artichokes are another fundamental part of Italian cousine. Food Historians believe that the plant originated in Southern Europe around theMediterranean Sea. Some say in Sicily, others in Tunisia(Carthage), nobody knows. We know that artichokes were cultivated in Sicily in the first century and, at that time, Greeks and Romans called it cynara. They thought artichokes had afrodisiac powers so they gave it the name of a girl Jupiter seduced and later transformed (more)

Thursday
Mar142013

CRISPY ARTICHOKES AND SHAVED BOTTARGA

An authentic traditional Sardinian recipe is Pasta with Artichokes and Bottarga, the salt-cured, sun-dried grey mullet roe. Sardinian chef Andrea Fresu added his own twist to this combination and sent us a photo of it: Crispy Artichokes and Shaved Bottarga with Hollandese Sauce Spiced with Norcia’s Truffle - carciofi croccanti e bottarga con (more)

Saturday
Mar092013

NATIONAL MEATBALL DAY

Unless  you are a vegetarian, you must love polpette (meatballs), polpettine (small meatballs) and polpettone (meatloaf). March 9 is National Meatball Day and it is not clear who started this food-holiday but it gained many followers right away. Our favorite recipe is beef and pork in equal proportions, stale bread (more)

Thursday
Mar072013

BEANS – CANNELLINI AND BORLOTTI

Beans are harvested in summer; it takes about 60 days from planting to harvest (start planting them now if you want to eat them in June) and some of us who are over 40 may remember shelling fresh beans’ pods for hours when we were young. Ancient Romans ate cowpeas (fagiolo dall’occhio), large-seeded broad beans like fava, and lupins, but they did not consider it 'noble' food because it was easy to grow, (more)

Sunday
Feb242013

VALENTINA'S BAGUETTE

Bread Baking Classes in Little Italy, New York City.

Valentina was born in Florence, Italy. Since she arrived in New York twenty years ago, she has been baking her own bread. In the past few years she has been teaching bread baking, along with her work as anarchitectural photographer with Vanni Archive.

Thursday
Feb072013

CARNIVAL TREATS

One of the most traditional Carnival treat in Italy is Castagnole, small soft balls, deep-fried and sprinkled with powdered sugar. Flour, eggs, butter, sugar, a touch of liqueur,  a bit of grated lemon zest, oil for deep frying, easy. Other traditional Carnival fritters are Frappe or Chiacchiere. Twisted like curled ribbons, also sprinkled with powdered sugar, they use the same ingredients of Castagnole but they are much lighter. (more)

Wednesday
Feb062013

TRY OUR 'MELAGNA'

This is the first exclusive Fonderia’s recipe we publish, something delicious we call Melagna. It’s layered like light lasagne (without besciamelle or ricotta) and it is extremely easy to make. First prepare a simple sugo (gravy, tomato sauce, however you like to call it) which means sauté chopped garlic, chopped carrots and a minced onion in extra-virgin olive oil until the onion is glassy and the garlic light yellow (soffritto). (more)

Tuesday
Jan292013

SARDINES, A HEALTHY CHOICE

Sicilians make the famous Pasta con le sarde, in Ischia they serve them almost raw, just slightly pickled, as an appetizer but you can find them in every other possible preparation everywhere in Italy. Sardines and pilchards are names used to refer to various small fish within the herring family. The European Pilchard is the true sardine. (more)

Saturday
Jan052013

ITALIANS BROUGHT BROCCOLI TO AMERICA

Since the Roman Empire - and probably long before that since it is native to the Mediterranean - broccoli has been considered a beneficial vegetable among Italians. A cousin of cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli rabé, kale, collard greens, and Brussels sprouts, broccoli is high in vitamin C, dietary fiber, it contains an anticancer compound, reduces the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, and it could reverse the damage caused by diabetes to heart blood vessels. It is also a winter vegetable, one that can stay fresh for a long time without refrigeration. (more)
Thursday
Jan032013

GREAT NATURAL CHEESE AND NO CHOLESTEROL

Sardinia is an island renown for its delightful cheeses. The problem is the level of cholesterol in dairy fat that scares us when we can't stop eating them. No more: the Biomedical Sciences Department of Cagliari University, together with the local Brotzu Hospital research center, and the University of Pisa, have developed all natural sheep cheeses that “enriched in α-linolenic (ALA) and conjugated linoleic and vaccenic acids (CLA and VA), improve the lipid profile and reduces anandamide in the plasma of hypercholesterolaemic subjects”. You guessed it: they lower your bad cholesterol levels. (more)

Sunday
Dec302012

NEW YEAR'S EVE LENTILS

New Year’s Eve is approaching and you know you have to eat a lot of lentils if you hope for prosperity in 2013, a tradition born most likely because of their round, coin-like form. Lentils have been part of the human diet since the Neolithic times: 10,000 years ago they were already a staple for ancient Near-Eastern and European cultures. (more)

Thursday
Dec202012

FEAST OF THE SEVEN FISHES

Ask Italian-born people and they'll tell you they have never heard of the Feast of the Seven Fishes. Some shake their heads in disbelief, some make annoying, snobbish remarks, you can even find articles where it is not recognized as an Italian tradition. Maybe these people have never heard of the number seven, but the Cenone della Vigilia (Christmas Eve’ big dinner) is inarguably one of the most important events in Italian tradition for the Old Country as well as the New. Christmas is a two-day feast, and on the Eve you eat fish and seafood, period. (more)

Wednesday
Dec192012

PIGNOLATA? STRUFFOLI?

Some people swear that Pignolata was introduced by the Sicilians to this country, while others call it Struffoli and guarantee it is a Neapolitan invention, born under the Vesuvio and brought here. In Calabria they call it Cicirata o Turdiddi, in Umbria and Abruzzo Cicerchiata. We are talking about the delicious pine cone shaped dessert made of deep fried balls of sweet dough dipped in honey or glazed, crunchy on the outside and light inside. (more)

Tuesday
Sep182012

Bottarga, Sardinian Caviar Too Hard To Find

As chef/author Anthony Bourdain put it, “While there's bottarga made elsewhere from other fish, I think this [Sardinian bottarga] is the best in the world.” A Mediterranean delicacy, bottarga is the roe pouch of the grey mullet salted, pressed, air-dried, and then coated to be preserved. It is prepared today as it was 3,000 years ago and it has a bright, briny flavor. “One of my favorite, if not my single favorite pasta ever” (more)

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