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BOOKER T WASHINGTON ON SICILIAN POVERTY

"The Negro is not the man farthest down. The condition of the colored farmer in the most backward parts of the Southern States in America, even where he has the least education and the least encouragement, is incomparably better than the condition and opportunities of the agricultural population in Sicily." Written by Booker T. Washington after his visits to the farmer fields near Palermo, and the sulphur mines in the mountainous part of Sicily. It was 1910, a little more than a year after the tragic earthquake that killed 120,000 people in Southern Italy.

Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an African-American educator, author, orator, and advisor to Republican presidents. He was the dominant leader in the African-American community in the United States from 1890 to 1915. Representative of the last generation of black American leaders born in slavery, he spoke on behalf of the large majority of blacks who lived in the South but had lost their ability to vote through disfranchisement by southern legislatures.

Source:

The Man Farthest Down (1912) by Booker T. Washington

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